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The Christian Constitutional Republic
One Nation Under God

Government of, by, and for the People

Liberty and Justice for All
by: Thomas Lee Abshier, ND


Supreme Court And Religion
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Thomas Jefferson


In his first Inaugural Address in 1801, President Thomas Jefferson stated:

Let us, then, with courage and confidence pursue our own federal and republican principles.... enlightened by a benign religion, professed, indeed, and practiced in various forms, yet all of them including honesty, truth, temperance, gratitude, and the love of man; acknowledging and adoring an overriding Providence, which by all its dispensation proves that it delights in the happiness of man here and his greater happiness hereafter. With all these blessings, what more is necessary to make us a happy and prosperous people? Still one thing more, fellow citizens a wise and frugal government.., which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned.... And may that Infinite Power which rules the destinies of the universe, lead our councils to what is best, and give them a favorable issue for your peace and prosperity.

Thomas Jefferson, while being the 3rd President (1801-1809), On March 23, 1801, Thomas Jefferson wrote from Washington, D.C. to Moses Robinson:

The Christian Religion, when divested of the rags in which they [the clergy] have enveloped it, and brought to the original purity and simplicity of its benevolent institutor, is a religion of all others most friendly to liberty, science, and the freest expansion of the human mind.

Thomas Jefferson, on April 21, 1803, wrote to Dr. Benjamin Rush, (also a signer of the Declaration of Independence):

My views... are the result of a life of inquiry and reflection, and very different from the anti-christian system imputed to me by those who know nothing of my opinions. To the corruptions of Christianity I am, indeed, opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. I am a Christian in the only sense in which he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines in preference to all others.

On June 17, 1804, in a letter to Henry Fry, Thomas Jefferson Writes:

I consider the doctrines of Jesus as delivered by himself to contain the outlines of the sublimest system of morality that has ever been taught...

On March 4, 1805, in his Second Inaugural Address, President Thomas Jefferson declared:

I shall now enter on the duties to which my fellow-citizens have again called me, and shall proceed in the spirit of those principles which they have approved.... I shall need, therefore, all the indulgence I have heretofore experienced.

I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our forefathers, as Israel of old, from their native land and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessities and comforts of life, who has covered our infancy with His Providence and our riper years with His wisdom and power, and to whose goodness I ask you to join with me in supplications that He will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils and prosper their measures, that whatever they do shall result in your good, and shall secure to you the peace, friendship and approbation of all nations.

In matters of religion I have considered that its free exercise is placed by the Constitution independent of the powers of the General Government. I have therefore undertaken, on no occasion, to prescribe the religious exercise suited to it; but have left them, as the Constitution found them, under the direction and discipline of state and church authorities by the several religious societies.

President Thomas Jefferson, March 4, 1805, offered this National Prayer for Peace:

Almighty God, Who has given us this good land for our heritage; We humbly beseech Thee that we may always prove ourselves a people mindful of Thy favor and glad to do Thy will. Bless our land with honorable ministry, sound learning, and pure manners. Save us from violence, discord, and confusion, from pride and arrogance, and from every evil way. Defend our liberties, and fashion into one united people the multitude brought hither out of many kindreds and tongues.

Thomas Jefferson stated:

A more beautiful or precious morsel of ethics I have never seen; it is a document in proof that I am a real Christian; that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus. (Lives of the Presidents of the United States, Abbott and Conwell, p. 142)

Of all the systems of morality, ancient or modern, which have come under my observation, none appear to me so pure as that of Jesus. (Thomas Jefferson's writings Vol. 8, p. 377)

The doctrines which flowed from the lips of Jesus himself are within the comprehension of a child; but thousands of volumes have not yet explained the Platonisms engrafted on them. (Thomas Jefferson's writing's Volume 14, p.149)

Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christians. (Tyronne Edwards, D.D. The New Dictionary of Thoughts, a Cyclopedia of Quotations, p. 91)

I have always said, I always will say, that the studious perusal of the sacred volume will make better citizens, better fathers, and better husbands. Tyronne Edwards, D.D. The New Dictionary of Thoughts, a Cyclopedia of Quotations, p. 46)

1. The doctrines of Jesus are simple and tend to the happiness of man.

2. There is only one God, and He is all perfect.

3. There is a future state of rewards and punishment.

4. To love God with all the heart and thy neighbor as thyself is the sum of all. These are the great points on which to reform the religion of the Jews. (The Life of Jefferson, by Shmucher)

No one sees with greater pleasure than myself the progress of reason in its advance toward rational Christianity, and my opinion is that if nothing had ever been added to what flowed from His lips, the whole world would at this day been Christian... Had there never been a commentator there never would have been an infidel. I have little doubt that the whole country will soon be rallied to the unity of our Creator, and, I hope, to the pure doctrines of Jesus also. (Library of American Literature, Volume 3, p. 283-284)

The precepts of philosophy and of the Hebrew code, laid hold of actions only. [Jesus] pushed his scrutinies into the heart of man, erected his tribunal in the regions of his thoughts, and purified the waters at the fountain head. (William Linn, The Life of Thomas Jefferson, 1834, p. 265)

On September 11, 1804, Thomas Jefferson wrote to Abigail Adams: "Nothing in the Constitution has given them [federal judges] a right to decide for the Executive, more than the Executive to decide for them....But, the opinion which gives to the judges the right to decide what laws are constitutional, and what not, not only for themselves in their own sphere of action, but for the legislature and the executive also, in their spheres, would make the judiciary a despotic branch."

quotes from: America's God and Country by William J. Federer